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Building a Sun Tracker
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 14 April 2011 10:40

pyroelectro.com writes:

As the solar power industry grows, so must too sun tracking circuitry. This project gives a short but sweet example of how to build a system for sun-tracking. It’s not professional grade, but it is a great place to start if you’re looking to build your own sun-tracking solar panel.

Building a Sun Tracker –[Link]

Last Updated on Thursday, 14 July 2011 01:02
 
Drawdio hack: the Syntheslicer!
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 10 March 2011 00:00
The Syntheslicer

Drawdio hack: the Syntheslicer!


The Syntheslicer

It’s very simple to build, once you’ve made the circuit: find a knife with a non-metallic grip (wood, plastic, or rubber should all work). Attach the Drawdio to the handle. Using copper tape connect one end of the circuit board to the blade, and the other end to the handle so that your hand will be touching copper when you hold the knife. That’s it! To use it, hold the Syntheslicer in one hand and a fork with a metallic handle in the other, and start playing with your food!

Last Updated on Friday, 11 March 2011 01:55
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The CO2inator
Written by Administrator   
Wednesday, 09 March 2011 00:00
A guest project by Rich Faulhaber, contributing Evil Mad Scientist.


Setup

"Infusing unsuspecting whole fruit with gaseous CO2 in the entire Tri-State Area!"


In an effort to make fruit fun for the kids, I built a carbon dioxide injector from parts in my garage with the purpose of carbonating whole fruit! With a common house water filter housing, a 16 Oz paintball CO2 canister, an old gas regulator, and some miscellaneous valves and fittings, I was able to bring this fizz fruit apparatus to life, and the kids love the results.


The principle
Carbon dioxide dissolves well in water, hence the reason you find it as the source of fizz in all your favorite soda drinks. When you open your soda and let it sit out on the counter you will find that after some period of time the soda loses its fizz and becomes "flat." The rate at which the drink loses its fizz depends on pressure, temperature and the surface area of the liquid and the environment. Skipping the thermodynamics lecture, let me just tell you that the process works in reverse as well. To reverse this process, one needs only to have a high pressure CO2 environment, a medium to infuse (i.e., the fruit) and enough time to let the gas diffuse across the fruit skin and dissolve into the water inside. Refrigerating the fruit helps tremendously in the process as well.


Valve

Parts list

  • 16 Oz paintball cylinder (or a more proper CO2 tank if you happen to have one)
  • Gas Regulator
  • Household water filter housing
  • Some hose
  • Toggle or ball valve
  • Miscellaneous fittings to hook it all up
  • Fruit

This type of water filter housing is designed to withstand water pressures in excess of 100 psi, and it comes with two ports and an o-ring seal. These can be bought for about ten dollars at Lowes or Home Depot. Its ports are standard 3/4-inch type. Use Teflon tape (plumbers tape) on all the threads. Thread in a plug on one side and a valve on the other. I used a toggle valve with a quick disconnect to make everything easier. The hose can by any standard type rated for at least 100 psi. Small bundles are available in the plumbing section of your hardware store.

For gas handling I used an old single stage regulator. These can be quite expensive new but often times you can find deals at garage sales or in surplus stores. You don't need anything fancy, just something to step down the pressure to something manageable-- well below 100 psi. My CO2 source is a standard-issue paintball cylinder.


Pressure

Procedure:


  1. Pre-chill the fruit in the refrigerator. Get it nice and cold. My favorites are grapes, oranges and blueberries. However, just about any fruit with a large water content will work.
  2. Open the house water filter by unscrewing the lid. Place your cold fruit inside.
  3. Connect the CO2 tank to your water filter housing. This is where the quick disconnects come in handy.
  4. Adjust the regulator output to about 40-60 psi, the higher the better but make sure all your connections are extra tight and sealed or "it might get dangerous." If you think you have a leak somewhere, you can apply some soapy water where you think the leak is and look for bubbles. If you see bubble just tighten until they stop forming.
  5. Start pressurizing the house filter by opening the toggle valve. On top of the water filter housing there is a pressure relief button. Depress this while you fill to get some of the residual air out.
  6. Once pressurized, shut the toggle valve and disconnect the CO2 line. You can store the unit in the fridge or somewhere out of sight.
  7. Then, you wait. Depending on the fruit, temperature, and pressure, carbonation should occur between 20-60 minutes. If you go too long at too high a pressure the skin of the fruit can burst and it will be a big mess, if you go too short and at too low of a pressure, the results will be unimpressive. Experiment with your fruit, pressure, and duration until it suits your tastes.
  8. Open the toggle valve to release the pressurized gas then unscrew the lid to the housing and enjoy your newly carbonated fruit.


Fruit

And of course, the kids love the "poppy fizz" inside the fizzy fruit.

via: http://www.evilmadscientist.com/article.php/co2inator

Last Updated on Wednesday, 09 March 2011 02:22
 
Cheapskate: Coffee Sleeve Phone Video Stand
Written by does it pew   
Monday, 07 March 2011 17:56
Have you ever been stuck in the Airport and really want to watch a movie or do you quickly realize once you have boarded the plane that you don't want to be holding the tablet or phone for the whole flight?

Why not enjoy this double recycling (as it is made of recycled cardboard to begin with) of a disposable phone stand?

Its pretty simple,

1. Take the sleeve off of your luke warm or gone coffee cup
2. Fold in the sides till they hit the edges of the Dunkin Donuts printing
3. Fold in (airports have no scissors) or cut just above the printing
4. Done.



You might be interested to know that if you wish to keep your phone standing in portrait that you can fit your iPhone or Android charing cable in the small crevice.

*To those who are uber cheapskate, you can always just grab a coffee sleeve by the condiments of most every coffee serving establishment.*

Last Updated on Tuesday, 23 August 2011 23:48
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Printing transistors using a 3D printer
Written by admin   
Wednesday, 02 March 2011 00:00

Authors: admin


Mr.Kim and John Sarik used a 3d printer configured as a plotter to print their own transistors. They appear to have tried a number of know recipes for OFETs, including TIPS-Pentacene and P3HT as semiconducting materials. The files that they used for printing are all available. 

Printing transistors using a 3D printer –[via]

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Last Updated on Wednesday, 02 March 2011 02:43
 
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